Spirit Week!

  It’s our last full week of kindergarten. Naturally, we’re in the midst of review, assessing the students, and reinforcing themes and skills that will benefit them going forward. We will be reviewing the two most recent themes: ‘Say Thank You’ and ‘Your Word is Truth.’ These are fitting topics to bookend our kindergarten bible curriculum. We started the year in August with the first two commands of the Decalogue: “Love God with Everything” and “Love Your Neighbor.”

It’s our last full week of kindergarten. Naturally, we’re in the midst of review, assessing the students, and reinforcing themes and skills that will benefit them going forward. We will be reviewing the two most recent themes: ‘Say Thank You’ and ‘Your Word is Truth.’ These are fitting topics to bookend our kindergarten bible curriculum. We started the year in August with the first two commands of the Decalogue: “Love God with Everything” and “Love Your Neighbor.”

The connection between the commands to love God and love neighbor is even more inseparable than a kindergartner’s love for their Pokémon cards. In Matthew 22, a lawyer asks Jesus: ‘"Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?" (Matthew 22:36). In his response, Jesus says that these two laws are the greatest (Love God, Love Neighbor), and that, “On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 22:40). In the same way, we used those first two laws to help guide the rules and order of our class this year.

As teachers, we do our best to remind students of how God’s word applies to each situation when we are correcting and/or exhorting students. It has been encouraging to see the students correct negative behavior, ungrateful attitudes, or reckless play when they are reminded of God’s perspective. Ms. Vagatai and I will be taking a moment to acknowledge each student regarding their growth/development and how they benefit the whole class. In doing this, we hope to help the students recognize how God’s word is becoming apart of their own journey.

So, that’s why the kindergartners are going to learn stop and reflect on their journey through a full academic year of learning and growing by looking back at all the lessons they have learned and how it’s impacted their day to day life. Then, they are going to stop and ‘Say Thank You’ to God, their friends, teachers, and their parents.

 

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Things to Know

  • This week’s themes to review: “Say Thank You” and “Your Word is Truth”

  • This week is SPIRIT WEEK: Check the flyer for details.

  • This TUESDAY is the Field Trip to Fire Station #36 and Old Hickory Park (due to the field trip, the Kindergartners will wear their Green Academy T-shirts instead of the Spirit week costume prompt)

Remembering a Whole Year of Lessons

 August 2017

August 2017

“Remember the long way that the Lord your God has led you these forty years in the wilderness, in order to humble you, testing you to know what was in your heart, whether or not you would keep his commandments.” (Deuteronomy 8:2)

Deuteronomy chapter 8 is a wonderful passage that I revisit often when it comes to reflecting on a season or portion of my life. Reflection and review is a necessary process within education and is a something that we as followers of God should do daily. This is a practice that is implemented at the Academy for all students including the Kindergarteners! We want them to learn how to process their own educational journey. The very first component would be in recognizing God’s presence within that journey and the lessons learned to instill his word in their hearts.

These next two weeks will be a review and reflection of a year packed with lessons and memories for the kindergartners. Join us in prayer as we near the end of a wonderful year of learning and growing. They have come so far and you should all feel so proud of them. We also want to encourage you can take some time throughout these next few weeks to have discussions about the ways you’ve seen them grow and learn. This can be as simple as going through your photos together or even looking through past Class Dojo posts. We’re looking forward to the blessing of remembering God’s guidance in their little lives this past year and anticipate many tears of thanksgiving for all that he has done.

Growing Storytellers

Recounting stories of God’s goodness, of family fun, of hard lessons learned, of belly laughs with friends, and of celebration, are apart of learning how to remember who we are. For the Kindergarteners, learning to take on the identity of being “God’s kids” means gaining an awareness about themselves and also, making considerations for how their behavior affects others. Law #3 is: “Remember, you are God’s kids and you represent him to others, make him proud!” The book of Deuteronomy helps us to understand the importance of incorporating stories of faith from our current moment, but also through our historical biblical narrative.  “You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise” (Deut. 6:7).

As teachers and parents we can partner together to emphasize God’s laws to our children so that it becomes apart of their character. In Beginnings class we recount our weekly themes, and make direct biblical applications to issues that arise in the week. For example, Ms. Vagatai and I have recently addressed emerging behavior trends like ‘negative words’ and horseplay. Since the students are familiar with all 10 of God’s Commandments, we can apply them to incidents of rowdy behavior and idle conversations. 

Our students are learning how to make considerations for God’s ethical expectations and apply them to their personal and social experiences.

Spiritual disciplines such as prayer, praise, and of course, bible stories further connect students to being God’s kids. Especially on Wednesdays (Chapel/formal-dress day) we get to have dedicated time for these activities, which help to build their ethical worldview and encourage a sensitivity to our Lord.

  For example, our theme this last week was  ‘Have joy in the Lord always, again, I say rejoice”  .  Along with her classmates, Anayah Aaseby, pictured above, takes great pride in telling a story of   a joy-filled memory.

For example, our theme this last week was ‘Have joy in the Lord always, again, I say rejoice” .  Along with her classmates, Anayah Aaseby, pictured above, takes great pride in telling a story of a joy-filled memory.

  Students also heard stories of joy from John 1 (Mary and Elizabeth) and Acts 3 (Peter, John, and the healed man). Liam Bennecker, pictured above, is perfecting the exchange of joy between Mary and Elizabeth--- he has a brand new baby in his own family, a sister, and loves talking about her to his classmates.

Students also heard stories of joy from John 1 (Mary and Elizabeth) and Acts 3 (Peter, John, and the healed man). Liam Bennecker, pictured above, is perfecting the exchange of joy between Mary and Elizabeth--- he has a brand new baby in his own family, a sister, and loves talking about her to his classmates.

This is also a value communicated to the ancient Hebrews (God’s people). "When your son asks you in time to come, 'What is the meaning of the testimonies and the statutes and the rules that the LORD our God has commanded you?' Then you shall say to your son, 'We were Pharaoh's slaves in Egypt. And the LORD brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand.” (Deut. 6:20-21a). Just as it was important for the ancient Hebrews,  it’s important for us to connect kids with how the Lord has led us, how his care and how his law affects our real-life experience today, and how he wants to ‘grow’ them into responsible, kind and ethical neighbors; competent and globally conscious; and historically relevant. Together as parents and educators, we can continue to encourage Kindergarteners to become storytellers who interpret the world as God's people!

Getting Ready for the Next Level

There’s just a little over a month left of school. The kindergarteners continue to grow and learn new lessons becoming more competent in meeting expectations with each class. They’ve worked hard at focusing during lessons and learning how to be kind to each other. Here is a list of skills we will be reviewing and focusing on this last month.

  • Prayer- Students will be asked to lead in prayer times.
  • Bells- Students have been introduced to the bell system. They will begin to adjust to hearing the transition warning and the bell to indicate when classes are beginning and ending.
  • Transitions- Students will be directed in utilizing transitions to use the bathroom, get a drink of water, and preparing their supplies for the next class.
  • Keeping a clean and orderly cubby
  • Charged iPad every day- at least 50% Lines- properly lining up and walking in a straight line following the teacher.
  • Listen & Obey- Students are expected to listen and obey the instructions of their teachers right away, all the way, and in a happy way!
  • Participation- Students are expected to participate in all class activities.

This in no way is an exhaustive list of all that they will be doing, but skills they need to make the transition into next year smooth. It’s going to be a full month!


This Week In Pictures!

Eager to Share

Kindergartners have so much to say, at all times. Upon arrival, students often share some novelty about their current moment:  “I sang in the car with my dad!” “I saw three worms yesterday!” “Tomorrow is my uncle’s birthday and we are going to eat cake!”

If you ever want be inundated with anecdotes, just ask a group of kindergartners their favorite things. They are eager to share and it's usually accompanied by sharply raised hands and a chorus of ‘ooh ooh’, ‘I do, I do” or ‘me me me me’. Unfortunately for them, we curtail this enthusiasm until a more appropriate time. To them it may seem unfair, but there are thirty students and the school day is only five hours long.

A student’s eagerness to share about their life is also a reflection of their emerging personality. This is why ‘Share Time Class’, held weekly on Wednesdays, has been so special for our Kindergarten group. Students share their stories, pictures, videos, or demonstrations, with confidence. Some are natural performers, while others take a while to warm up. Then, they get to call upon their classmates’ and field questions. Miss. Vagatai and I have been impressed by how the rest of the class ardently listens to their classmate’s presentation, and are quick to ask questions.

While the criteria for these presentations are a toy, a talent, a story, or a special interest represented by a physical model, it isn’t like ‘Show and Tell’. Instead, students are encouraged to share how their item, interest, or skill helps them connect to their family.

 Chloe told three stories of how her family has encountered snakes, which is why it has become a running joke ever since, to scare each other with a rubber replica. These mini-presentations have provided a small glimpse into each student's familial world that they don’t normally get to experience at school.

Chloe told three stories of how her family has encountered snakes, which is why it has become a running joke ever since, to scare each other with a rubber replica. These mini-presentations have provided a small glimpse into each student's familial world that they don’t normally get to experience at school.

In light of our goal to ‘holistically educate children’, we endeavor to provide students opportunities to both demonstrate and describe in their words, more about their world. Even at such a young age, they are learning that expressing their personal joys and interests can open up opportunities to build friendships and create memorable experiences with others. I have been and continue to be so proud of each of our students witnessing them take courage, and stand in front of their peers, and share with confidence.

Signs of Spring...Spring FEVER!

This week in Outdoor Adventures class, we had a lesson on “Signs of Spring”. Students were told to find all the signs that the season was changing from winter to spring in the world around them. While pointing to a budding tree, I realized that the students themselves were embodying “signs of spring” this last week; rambunctious, unable to focus and forgetting procedures and daily routines. Just like the tree, saving up all its energy during the winter and now releasing it in order to grow its leaves back, students have been conserving it all winter. Everything around them is telling them to let it loose!

Now, because I grew up in Hawai’i where there weren’t seasons like here (winter temps around 70’s and summer temps high 80’s), I still have to reorient myself around the changing of the seasons. In the same way, the children are re-orienting themselves and transitioning into the warmer times of the year. There are a lot of helpful articles on the web with ideas to deal with spring fever in kids. In my opinion, one of the best things to do is go on your own outdoor adventure with your little ones, look for signs of spring, and release all that bottled up energy.

The Real R’s of Kindergarten

Although we may want our kindergarten students to be excited about the foundational academic disciplines of Reading, Writing, and Counting (arithmetic), I guarantee that when you ask them their 3 favorite things about school, they are more likely to answer: Running, Recess, and Rotini noodles for lunch.

The truth is, most kids may not even be able to describe what they are learning at all. That's not a bad thing! They care, but they rarely express it in a way that makes us parents and teachers look good. What we do know is that positive social experiences, coupled with the opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas in various mediums (drawing, storytelling, sculpting, making videos, inventing games, etc), support their early educational journey.

And so, we have to take the time to teach them the process of learning. There are so many emotions that go on during academic activities such as reading, writing, counting, sculpting, drawing, etc. Even now, we can identify their differing strengths and preferences (often related to multiple intelligences). For example, on the intrapersonal (self-awareness) level, they get discouraged because their first and second tries don’t look the way they expected. This is when they say things like: ‘I give up’ or ‘I can’t do it’. Or, they are bursting with pride in their project and say: ‘Mr. Dunning, Mr. Dunning, look at this, look at this!’. On the interpersonal (relationship to others) level, they start looking around at others and feel left behind and/or disappointed in their work. Ultimately, we want them to learn how to navigate their emotions.

One way we approach this is by reframing their moment, one they’ve marked with mistake or imperfection, as ‘The Dip’.

Essentially, every time you learn something new, you may feel bound to the frustration and want to give up. Some students can feel overwhelmed, and even left behind.

  This image from Dr. Seuss’  Oh The Places You’ll Go  express this ‘Dip’ in the process of learning. After we read this in class, the students expressed how they could relate to the character.

This image from Dr. Seuss’ Oh The Places You’ll Go express this ‘Dip’ in the process of learning. After we read this in class, the students expressed how they could relate to the character.

As adults, we can confidently share stories with our students of how we got through ‘the Dips’ of learning (reading, writing, social skills, etc) and how we persevere. By doing this, we are teaching them how to live by faith. Enduring the challenges and mistakes of learning requires faith, and it produces good character. Paul writes in Romans 5:3(b)-5 that: “we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us”. Kindergartners can greatly benefit from this encouragement because we want them to learn the skills of how to make it through.

So, the real R’s of kindergarten should focus them on the process of getting through ‘the Dip’:

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What Are Jesus Movies?

Perhaps you’ve heard your student come home and talk about Jesus Movies. If you were wondering, no, it’s not The Jesus Film that has been translated into 1,625 different languages and distributed around the world. “Jesus Movies” is a class we had last semester every Wednesday wherein we discussed the various themes presented in different movies.


Although we do not have “Jesus Movies” class this semester, we still use clips, shows, and other videos to discuss certain themes and topics. These types of discussions prompted by media allow for students develop their critical thinking skills at an early age. Having media shown and taking the time to pause in order to discuss a theme, behavior of a character, or an event that is happening, allows students to think through what is being shown. They learn to evaluate it and then connect it to what they are learning in the class.

This practice allows students to learn that media should be critically evaluated and discussed instead of passively absorbed. Part of being historically relevant is recognizing the amount of exposure that our children have to media. It’s literally at their fingertips (iPads and other devices). Kindergartners know that we show movies or clips with a purpose and that we will always pause to discuss relevant issues.

Lastly, we utilize the Word that they are learning to help them be able to filter through the information coming through the screen. Characters in the movies and shows they watch don’t have to become an example they follow, unless they behave in such a way that is in line with God’s desire for humanity. This class makes movies and shows that much more dynamic, and allows the students to gain critical thinking skills that will only enhance their literacy, reading, writing, problem-solving, listening, comprehension, and spirituality. We love Jesus Movies!


This Week in Pictures

Count on Me, like 1-2-3!

We’re playing with numbers in Kindergarten. Have you heard your child mention Mancala (1) yet? When students begin Kindergarten, they’re able to recite numbers audibly and identify most numerical symbols. (Thank you parents!) Yet, they are just beginning to explore how numbers, and their symbols and amounts, relate to one another.

According to cognitive development theorists, even though kids can master basic counting (numbers 1-10) as early as three years old, up until the age of six, they still struggle to conceptualize how to compare numbers to each other, or even recognize equal values (2). Yet, students at this level can master these concepts. It takes practice and problem-solving.

Which is why we're helping your child interact and gain confidence with numbers in a fun and memorable way- games! We’ve made our own abacuses, our own coloring board game with egg cartons and markers, and then used those exact cartons to make Mancala game trays.

At this point in the quarter, students have practiced counting to 100, sorting numbers into groups, comparing amounts, decomposing numbers sets (5 and 10), writing numbers 1-10, and demonstrating 1-1 correspondence. This week students will get to practice what they’ve learned through a version of ‘eraser bowling’ and may even compete in an ultimate Mancala tournament. Count on them to want to play at home too!


1) Mancala is a generic name for an ancient 2-player game, played in various countries in Africa and Asia, which involves counting out beans or stones in some form a tray (we’re using egg cartons!).

2) Muldoon, K., Lewis, C., & Freeman, N. (2009). Why set-comparison is vital in early number learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13, 203–208.

Spring on the FUN!

 After our initial lesson in 'Sculpt This!' Class, we offered an additional team challenge. They could earn extra points by creating something together. The Orange Team, pictured above, made a playdough village and earned 3 extra Class Dojo points! 

After our initial lesson in 'Sculpt This!' Class, we offered an additional team challenge. They could earn extra points by creating something together. The Orange Team, pictured above, made a playdough village and earned 3 extra Class Dojo points! 

Although it’s been a challenging few weeks for the Kindergarten class, no streak of illness nor rain showers could thwart the enthusiasm of our students.

Keeping with our quarter’s themes of Teamwork and Cooperation, we divided the students up into 5 teams for the rest of the quarter: Team Orange, Purple, Green, Red, and Blue. These designations have built excitement and comradery among the students, and even led to some creative team names. A sampling, for your enjoyment: ‘‘The Purple Cheetahs” and “The Blue Tiger Star Wars Michael Jordans”. (I didn’t realize they knew who Michael Jordans is… I still wonder if they know.) In addition to games, teams also work together for Chores Class. For many of the students, this has been a great opportunity to intentionally consider their character and how it affects their team. They are charged to work together through a pre-assigned clipboard checklist of tasks. It’s been encouraging to watch them work through the inevitable conflict of “whose turn it is”, and stepping up to take responsibility for their environment.

Also, the kids have been particularly energized by our new teaching assistant, Mr. Kyle Becker. He attends to the students during Letters (Writing) Class on Tuesdays and Fridays. His engaging personality has engulfed both the interest and attention of the entire class. We used a ‘wheel of letters’ to write-in the punchlines for really, really, corny jokes. Then, we wrote words with q-tips in ‘mysterious goo’ (tempera paint in ziplock bags). The students are having way too much fun using their imaginations as a springboard for their writing exercises.

 As you’ve probably already heard, this Friday was such a wild lesson: “Riding down the River of Writing” with Mr. Becker. Mr. Becker shared his real-life experience as a river-rafting guide to take us down the treacherous river of writing, in our custom-made kindergarten rafts.   Learning to use letters in reading and writing can sometimes be a wild ride, but when we listen to our guide and work together, we’ll all stay afloat.

As you’ve probably already heard, this Friday was such a wild lesson: “Riding down the River of Writing” with Mr. Becker. Mr. Becker shared his real-life experience as a river-rafting guide to take us down the treacherous river of writing, in our custom-made kindergarten rafts. Learning to use letters in reading and writing can sometimes be a wild ride, but when we listen to our guide and work together, we’ll all stay afloat.

 Our exploration was not complete until we made our own segmented earthworms out of aluminum foil. Levi Madron, pictured above, shows off his worm!

Our exploration was not complete until we made our own segmented earthworms out of aluminum foil. Levi Madron, pictured above, shows off his worm!

Lastly, this probably won’t be the first time this Spring that our Outdoor Adventures Class will be moved inside. Ms. Vagatai and I do our best to bring the outside, inside. ;) We led the students on an “information gathering hunt”, and sought to answer the question: why don’t we see earthworms in wintertime, even when it rains (like we do in summertime)? As a class, we started with a wildlife encyclopedia where we learned a few initial facts. Then, we transitioned into a few curated videos about worm habits and how some people from other parts of the world actually eat worms (delicious)!  Students did their best to engage there naturalist intelligence as a class, even being indoors. We’re looking forward to another great week.

Learning to Ask Questions

Children are curious. Period. This is a gift to us all and something that we want to encourage and foster here at the Academy for G.O.D. Naturally questions come as students continue to be given opportunities for discovery in each class. Even in Kindergarten!

When I was a student, questions were not encouraged at all. I honestly do not remember asking any questions in the history of my K-12 education. Not one! I definitely had them, I just never felt safe enough to voice them as I perceived through other student's experiences that it wasn't a welcomed activity. 

Thankfully, this is not the reality for your students. We love their questions. Not only do they help me as a teacher gauge understanding and memory retention, but to also gain insight to their interests and personalities. Sometimes they'll ask a question and I'll throw it back at them.

"Why did Jacob trick his dad and take his brother's birthright?" asks the student.

"Well, why do you take things from your siblings?" I ask. 

Now I have an opportunity not only to keep them engaged in a story but to develop their interpersonal/intrapersonal faculties, show them that they have similar experiences, and also really lock down the importance of listening and obeying Law #7. 

All that to say, when it comes to your student's questions we say: "Fire away!"

Trying New Things

Hello! Mr. Dunning here!

The Kindergartners are being introduced to a lot of new concepts this year. Their first few months of school were spent learning to navigate a new environment (the classroom) and all the expectations that come with it. At this point they have become confident and curious students who are learning to take on new challenges.

This past week, they were able to explore concepts of math, science, language, creative arts and social skills by engaging their problem-solving skills. In “Numbers Class” we are learning to decompose larger numbers into smaller units. Through the experimentation of breaking apart sets of 10 objects into two number groups (5&5, 7&3, etc.), they discovered the physical representation of basic math (addition, subtraction, division). At this stage, they have now learned that counting is more than just a catchy vocal pattern, but that each number represents things worth sorting, grouping, and maneuvering.

Also, in “Sculpt This! Class” Kindergarteners discovered ways to make new colors with modeling clay by combining 2-3 primary colored pieces into one new exciting color. These activities allow kids to explore new ideas and think through issues of cause and effect. Who knew that combining equal parts red and yellow, with a small piece of white, would result in a peculiar pink, rather than orange, which so happened to be abnormally sticky and, unfortunately, hard to wash off ?

However, we know Kindergartners learn valuable habits and lessons from guided exploration. Even when their experimental efforts don’t produce the desired outcome, we facilitate the time to stop, reflect, and try again. We witnessed this exercise in our most recent “Exploratory Hour Class”. After watching clips of meticulously constructed marble runs (downhill marble race tracks) in action, the students were challenged to work in groups to construct their own marble runs using legos and other classroom supplies.

On their first attempt, the students had fun making elaborate mazes and ramps. Yet, their designs did not take into account the need for the gravitational force necessary to get their marbles to go. So, we stopped to think through the problem and explored solutions. Ultimately, they were introduced to the need for a diagonal ramp to sustain speed. Along the way, they were able to think through issues of cause/effect and engage their observational skills in order improve their next design. This habit of action, reflection, and modified action allows their developing minds to make connections and forge new neural-pathways--- This is the brain’s Neuroplasticity at work.

Further, the ability to reflect on their actions and explore scenarios of cause/effect aids in young students’ social and ethical development. In our “Beginnings Class”, we have been discussing how recent weekly themes of ‘Don’t Hit Anyone’,  ‘Don’t Be Mean to Your Family’ , and ‘Don’t Take Things from People’ are God’s laws that help us not Cause hurt to others in ways that Affect everyone. The students explored how Jacob’s actions toward his brother Esau greatly affected their relationship (Genesis 25-27) during “Chapel and Bible Stories Class”. Our weekly themes and bible stories give the Kindergartners an ethical framework to work through issues of their  personal behavior and interpersonal conflicts, especially when we help them apply what they are learning in real-time.

Essentially, every part of their school experience is an exciting exploration of new things. They are being introduced so many new concepts and it requires them to develop new skills. Everything from mastering the climbing wall  during recess, listening to others in group projects, public speaking (share time), learning to read, eating vegetables at lunch, basic math principles, improving their marble run, to showing self-control (along with love, joy, peace, etc.), when you just want to go home and be with your mom. In Kindergarten, every day is a new day and a chance to try new things.

What's New In Kindergarten?

Hello Kindergarten Parents!

Mr. Dunning and I would like to invite you to this teacher blog in order to learn a little more about all the fun that has been happening in Kindergarten. Let’s start with the hot topics: new classes on Formal Wednesday’s and Reading Class!

Share Time Class and Exploratory Hour

On Formal Wednesday’s your students will have a “Share Time” and “Exploratory Hour”. Share Time class will give an opportunity for each student to have a slotted time to share something about their lives in a 3-5 minute presentation. Following their presentation, their fellow will have an opportunity to ask questions. This will allow them to grow in their interpersonal awareness of each other by learning something new.

Exploratory Hour class is exactly that; an hour of exploring. These last two weeks of Exploratory Hour we’ve built parachutes and kites. Although this class can be a lot of fun, it also offers a higher opportunity for frustration. Students are not only encouraged to explore topics themselves but also to work on creating their own projects with minimum hands-on help from their teachers. These are wonderful opportunities to learn about various subjects but to also work on essential skills like tying knots, using scissors, and learning perseverance.

Reading is cool!

There is a real hunger in all Kindergarteners this semester to learn how to read. We've done a lot of work to help them to understand the importance of learning how to read and also showing them that reading is fun. Something we've reminded the students is that God desires them to be able to read his word and so he will help them in this endeavor. "And this is the boldness we have in him, that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us." (1 Jn. 5:14)

Many of you have inquired and yes learning how reading will continue this semester. Of course, literacy has to do with a lot more than just decoding words and the physical letters on the page. Not only have students been learning how to read in Reading class, but they have been pushed to learn how to read the world around them and pushed to decode in other classes like Cooperative Games and even Chores class! I am thankful for their desire to learn to read because this enthusiasm will carry them through their literacy journey. If your child is asking for more reading feel free to give it to them! The more their desire to read grows and opportunities of exposure to the written word are provided to match that desire, the more they'll thrive. 

Highlights of January: