Final Fourth Quarter Courses

Hello Parents! We have completed our first week of our fourth quarter subjects. We have moved into the themes of Movie Making and Sculpting! The students seem excited about these subjects. They already have a fascination with making movies and are eager to learn more about the process. The students are also interested in sculpting as many of them are unfamiliar with the medium, but like to work with their hands. Please read below to learn more about the classes that your students are talking about!

Monday/Thursday Theme: Home Economics

Video Time: In this course students will work with units of time including seconds, minutes and hours. They will practice converting units, and adding and subtracting whole and mixed numbers.

Multiple Intelligences:  Logical/Mathematical

Main Manipulatives: iPad, Paper, Pencil

Goals/Objectives:

  1. Students will learn to convert minutes into seconds.
  2. Students will learn to add/subtract time allotments with two different units of measurements (Ex: 1 hour 20 minutes plus 2 hours 15 minutes) 
  3. Students will practice dividing whole numbers in half.

Screenwriting: In this course students will learn the fundamentals of screenwriting, and the skill of scriptwriting. Students will learn the key vocabulary and key roles associated with screenwriting; screenplay, screenwriter, audience, dialogue and script editor. Students will identify their audience, assign screenwriting roles, and in group collaboration write a 2-minute screenplay “cooking tutorial”. The screenplay will include an introduction, body/instructions, and a conclusion.

Multiple Intelligences: Linguistic, Interpersonal/Social

Main Manipulatives: Paper, pencil, iPad

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will create a comprehensive outline that includes an introduction, body/instructions, and a conclusion.
  2. Students will learn to use quotation marks in their script dialogue to indicate when actors are speaking.

Movie Magic: In Movie Magic, students will be focusing on framing - adjusting foreground and background of video as well as implementing the rule of thirds. They'll further use the skill of multi angle shooting to create and edit videos based on scripts they create in Screenwriting.

Intelligences: Linguistic, Spatial/Visual, Interpersonal

Main Manipulatives: iPad, Screenwriting Scripts

Goal of this course:

  1. Students will create a 60 second instructional cooking video.
  2. Students will be able to delegate tasks and work together to finish their video.
 Students were put into pairs so that they could effectively record their project. Jaelyn and Shae are practicing their new knowledge about framing and thirds.

Students were put into pairs so that they could effectively record their project. Jaelyn and Shae are practicing their new knowledge about framing and thirds.

Bible

Bible: This class will continue to be a constant throughout this quarter. Here is the synopsis again for what the students are learning with Mr. Duffy:

This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be able to understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

During these next two weeks, students will work through Leviticus 10:10-11 and the responsibility that God has placed on leadership.

Goals of this course:

  1. Student can give a biblical definition of leadership.
  2. Student can explain the concepts of negotiation and diplomacy.
 Students were divided up into tribes and had to determine amongst themselves based on their needs (occupation and number of members) which piece of the land they should get.

Students were divided up into tribes and had to determine amongst themselves based on their needs (occupation and number of members) which piece of the land they should get.

 

Tuesday/Friday Theme: Anatomy & Biology

Leg-I-See: In this Creative Arts course the students will learn how to care for clay. They will use clay to take a hands-on approach to understanding the leg bones and muscles by creating clay models of the bones and muscles they have learned about. This will help to lock down the anatomical names of the leg muscles and bones, as well as continue to refine their fine motor skills. They will use both the Spatial and Logical/Mathematical intelligences to create a scaled model of the bones and muscle groups.

Multiple Intelligences: Spatial, Bodily/Kinesthetic

Main Manipulatives: Paper, pencil, clay

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will create and label 4 major leg bones.
  2. Students will create and label 3 major muscle groups.
IMG_0307.jpeg

 

It's the Pits!: In this course the students will continue their study of the human body. They will learn the names and locations of the three major bones and muscles/muscle groups in the arm. They will continue to utilize their natural intelligence to categorize the type of muscle tissue found in the arms (smooth and skeletal).

Multiple Intelligences: Natural, Bodily/Kinesthetic

Main Manipulatives: Paper, pencil

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will learn the names and locations of the 4 major bones of the arm.
  2. Students will learn the names and locations of the 3 major muscle/muscle groups in the arm.

Michelangelingo: Students will practice their reading skills and reading comprehension. Through learning about the art of sculpting, students will focus on breaking down multi-syllable and compound words. They will practice reading silently to expand their personal memory and their utilization of context clues to decode new words. They will also write down unknown words and use their Dictionary App on their iPads to learn the definitions. At the end of the class, students will have learned 5 new terms related to sculpting.

Multiple Intelligences: Linguistic

Main Manipulatives: Paper, Pencil, iPads, Printed articles

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn to use the dictionary app and identify the rood word.
  2. Students will practice the proper ratios between uppercase and lowercase letters in their handwriting.
     

It's All In Your Head: Students will explore the medium of clay to create a model of the human brain. The first week focuses on form and planning and week two will implement what we’ve planned into a clay sculpture. Students will use paper and pencil to first sketch a brain and identify each part and its function. The students will then use that sketch as a point of reference for sculpting. This class utilizes bodily/kinesthetic and spatial intelligences.

Multiple intelligences: Bodily-Kinesthetic, Spatial-Visual

Main Manipulatives: Paper, pencil, clay

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn the names and locations of the 3 major parts of the brain.
  2. Students will create a model of the human brain out of clay.

 

New Subjects

Hello Everyone! The students have just completed the first week of a new unit of classes this quarter; the focus has now shifted fo Sewing and Gymnastics! The students have been very enthusiastic about the change and are even more excited about the class projects that they have started.

Monday/Thursday Theme: Home Economics

  • Measure Me!: In ‘Measure Me!’ students will use the craft of sewing to learn new units of measurement, and practice multiplication and division by 2. Students will use measuring tapes and sticks to practice finding measurements in inches, feet and yards, and translating lengths to different units (i.e. 6 inches= ½ ft).

Intelligences: Logical/Mathematical, Spatial/Visual

Main Manipulatives: Fabric, Yarn, Measuring sticks/tape

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn to competently use a measuring stick and tape to find length in feet and inches.
  2. Students will learn to double measurements that include both whole numbers and mixed numbers.
  3. Students will practice dividing whole numbers in half.
     
 Students have been learning about writing in a straight line with appropriate letter sizing, as well as how to determine the meaning of a word based on context clues in the surrounding text. They are doing this through the study of Story Blankets that exist in different cultures.

Students have been learning about writing in a straight line with appropriate letter sizing, as well as how to determine the meaning of a word based on context clues in the surrounding text. They are doing this through the study of Story Blankets that exist in different cultures.

  • Story Blankets: In this Language Arts course students will learn the art of storytelling through quilt making/story blankets. Students will first be introduced to the presence of these “story blankets” in several different cultures. They will then learn the history and purpose of story blankets specifically within the Hmong refugee communities. They will read through accounts and identify key vocabulary, using context clues to break down new word meanings. Students will then create short stories to go with the story blankets they will create in their “Making Story Blankets” class.

Intelligences: Linguistic

Main Manipulatives: Notebook, Pencil, Supplementary articles

Goals of this course:

  1. Students can use context clues to break down new word meanings.
  2. Students can answer text-based questions and refer back to the text for the answer.
  3. Students can write a short story, capitalizing proper nouns appropriately.
     
  • Making Story Blankets: In this Creative Arts course, students will apply the elements of quilt-making that they learn in “Story Blankets” to work together as a homeroom to make a room quilt. Each student will be responsible for a block of the quilt to make sure that the block reflects either them and their story, or the story that the class decides to tell as a whole. Each student will be responsible for designing their block, measuring, cutting, and arranging their blocks, and then sewing/crocheting the blocks together with the aid of an adult and a sewing machine. This class will continue to develop the students’ ability to tell stories as well as work on their fine motor skills through stitching.

Intelligences: Bodily/Kinesthetic, Spatial/Visual, Logical/Mathematical

Main Manipulatives: Fabric, Thread, Needle, Scissors

Goals of this course:

  1. Students can successfully stitch fabric with evenly made stitches.
  2. Students can measure and cut a block of fabric accurately.
 Thank you to the wonderful parents who came in to help us start our Story Blankets! The students worked hard to measure their fabric to the correct size, cut it out with straight lines, and began the process for decorating their blocks.

Thank you to the wonderful parents who came in to help us start our Story Blankets! The students worked hard to measure their fabric to the correct size, cut it out with straight lines, and began the process for decorating their blocks.

Bible

  • Bible: This class will continue to be a constant throughout this quarter. Here is the synopsis again for what the students are learning with Mr. Duffy:

This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be able to understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

During these next two weeks, students will work through Leviticus 10:10-11 and the responsibility that God has placed on leadership.

Goals of this course:

  1. Student can give a biblical definition of leadership.
  2. Student can name two self-discipline techniques.
  3. Student can set two attainable self-discipline goals.

Tuesday/Friday Theme: Anatomy & Biology

  • Gymnastics: This class will look at the strength, flexibility and balance required in gymnastics. The students will demonstrate focus, concern for their own and others safety and ultimately will be about displaying self control in their body control.

    Intelligences: Spatial/Visual, Musical, Bodily-Kinesthetic

    Main Manipulatives: Students' own bodies

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will learn and display 25 balance poses.
  2. Students will create a simple routine and perform it.
     
 Students learned several exercises that would strengthen their core and increase their flexibility to help them with gymnastics.

Students learned several exercises that would strengthen their core and increase their flexibility to help them with gymnastics.

  • Gym Rats: Anatomy of the Torso: Students will continue learning about the anatomy of the human body by learning the names and locations of the major muscle and bone groups in the torso. They will review the functions of both muscles and bones, in addition to tendons and ligaments and how they all work together to provide movement. Students will also learn the different types of muscles that are in the body (skeletal, smooth, and cardiac) and the three main functions that skeletal muscles have. Learning these different categories within the body will help students to understand the physiology of their bodies better.

    Intelligences: Bodily-Kinesthetic, Linguistic, Spatial/Visual, Nature

    Main Manipulatives: iPads, Skeleton Model

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will learn the names and locations of the 4 major muscle groups of the torso.
  2. Students will learn the names and locations of the 3 major bones/bone group in the torso.
  3. Students will learn location and functions of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle.
     
  • Training of a Gymnast: In this Language Arts course, students will learn about the training that gymnasts undergo. They will read about the daily schedule including workouts regimens and dietary restrictions. Students will also read stories from the perspective of gymnasts about the different aspects of their training. As they read students will utilize the academic skill of note-taking during research, and using context clues to infer meeting with unfamiliar content. At the end of the 2-week block, students will write a schedule of what their day would look like if they were training to be a competitive gymnast.

Intelligence: Linguistic

Main Manipulatives: Paper, Pencils, iPads

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn to write a daily schedule in a sequential manner.
  2. Students will learn to create a schedule based on their needs (i.e. homework time, "getting ready" time, meal times, etc.).
     
  • It's Shake and Break, and I Helped!: Following the theme of Gymnastics, this Creative Arts course utilizes the creative form of dance to emphasize the students’ senses of balance, muscle isolation, and body control. The students will learn several dance moves which they will practice and utilize in a self-choreographed group dance. This creative arts course encourages interpersonal development as the students work together to accomplish a 1 minute dance.

Intelligences: Interpersonal/Social, Musical, Bodily/Kinesthetic

Main Manipulatives: Students' own bodies

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn and perform specific moves which focus on body control, muscle isolation, and balance.
  2. Students will work in groups to produce a one minute dance.
  3. Students will develop coordination of movements with rhythm.

 

A New Quarter Begins

 Tutorial student, Arianna Thomas, choreographed and led a dance time for both Black and Orange class one morning during Beginnings to help everyone start the day with movement. It was a fun time and all the students enjoyed it!

Tutorial student, Arianna Thomas, choreographed and led a dance time for both Black and Orange class one morning during Beginnings to help everyone start the day with movement. It was a fun time and all the students enjoyed it!

Hello Parents! This past Friday we concluded our 3rd quarter of this school year. The students enjoyed their two themes, Computer Science and Intercultural Studies, but they are also eager to start their new themes of Home Economics and Anatomy/Biology for the 4th quarter. 

Within these two themes we will cover the topics of baking, sewing, sculpting, soccer, gymnastics, and movie-making. The first two weeks we will utilize the topics of Baking and Soccer within our academic disciplines. Please take a look below to see the different classes that your student will have.

Monday/Thursday theme: Home Economics

  • Work It: Making Recipes Work For You: This STEM course will build on students’ understanding of multiplication and fractions. They will work with recipes to double or cut them in half, and calculate amounts for individual ingredients accordingly. More advanced students will practice tripling recipes.

Intelligences: Logical/Mathematical

Main Manipulatives: Cooking ingredients, pen and paper

Goals of this course:

  1. Translate teaspoons into tablespoons and vice-versa.
  2. Double and triple recipes that include western units of measurements (tsp, tbsp, cups, pints, quarts, and gallons).
  3. Cut a recipe in half by dividing all original measurements by 2.
  • This is MY Jam! Writing Your Own Recipes: In this course students will continue their study of written instructions by examining baking recipes. Students will note patterns in instructions and ingredients commonly used baking ingredients. They will create their own recipe book as a reference. In their recipe books they will have important baking vocabulary, the purpose of commonly used baking ingredients, and they will add a new recipe of their own. Students will have the chance to revise their recipes as they experiment with real ingredients in their “Watch me whip!: Bake your Own Recipe” course.

Intelligences: Linguistic, Nature

Main Manipulatives: Recipe book, pencil, iPad

Goals of this course:

  1. Students learn to compare and contrast baking recipes and note patterns in common ingredients.
  2. Students will define common baking vocabulary and note the purpose of important ingredients.
  3. Students will write their own recipe by modifying the ingredients of a recipe they already own
  • Watch Me Whip!: Bake Your Own Recipe: In this Creative Arts course, students will have the opportunity to exercise their creativity. They will learn about basic baking ingredients and guidelines in “This is MY Jam!,” and will put those to practice when creating their recipes. By exercising their nature intelligence through learning about the different categories of ingredients that make up a recipe (binder, elevator, etc.), students will learn how to edit a recipe to make their own creation. They will mix together all of their ingredients at school and taste it in the next class. When they taste their recipe in class they will determine what edits and adjustments need to be made, then they can try again!  

Intelligences: Linguistic, Nature

Main Manipulatives: Baking supplies, pencil, paper

Goals of this course:

  1. Create and edit a recipe using the scientific method.
  2. Learn how to problem solve an error in their recipe.
  3. Learn how to record their steps for experimental baking in an organized way.

Bible

  • Bible: This class will continue to be a constant throughout this quarter. Here is the synopsis again for what the students are learning with Mr. Duffy:

This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be able to understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

During these next two weeks, students will work through Leviticus 10:10-11 and the responsibility that God has placed on leadership.

Goals of this course:

  1. Student can give a Biblical definition of leadership.
  2. Student can name two self-discipline techniques.
  3. Student can set two attainable self-discipline goals.

Tuesday/Friday Theme: Anatomy & Biology

  • Playmaking: In this Creative Arts course the students will look at the space of the soccer field and critically think about how to move the ball from one point of the field to another while navigating around foreseeable obstacles. Students will expand their vocabulary by learning different terms related to soccer, and will continue to develop their interpersonal intelligence by working together with their teammates to make their play a success. Once the students develop their play they will have the opportunity to run it on the field and see their imagined plays come to life.

    Intelligences: Spatial/Visual, Linguistic, Bodily-Kinesthetic

    Main Manipulatives: Paper and pencil

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will be able to identify the roles of different positions on the soccer field.
  2. Students will create a step-by-step soccer play with diagrams and perform it on the field.
  3. Students will identify the importance of shapes in sports and incorporate the use of diamonds and triangle movements in their plays.
  • Watch Me Ney Ney: Neymar and the Anatomy of the Foot and Leg: Throughout this STEM class the students will study the anatomy of the lower limbs of the human body. They will learn the names of the major muscle groups and bones that make up the lower limbs, and they will learn how the musculoskeletal system works together to allow athletes to do a variety of different moves within the sport of soccer.

    Intelligences: Bodily-Kinesthetic, Linguistic, Spatial/Visual, Nature

    Main Manipulatives: iPads

Goals of this course: 

  1. Students will learn the names of the 4 major muscle groups and 5 primary bones in the lower limbs.
  2. Students can explain the functions of tendons and ligaments.
  3. Students can explain how muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments work together to make the body move.
  • GOOOOOOOAL!!!: Reporting A "Play By Play:" This course will focus on the students’ ability to verbalize what they see. They will have to use their linguistic intelligence and new vocabulary words introduced to them about the game of soccer to give an accurate, in real-time, description of what they are seeing on the soccer field. They will write announcer’s scripts for a soccer clip that they will then record themselves “announcing” as a sports announcer.

Intelligence: Linguistic

Main Manipulatives: Paper, pencils, iPads

Goals of this course:

  1. Students learn to translate what they see into written word.
  2. Students learn to narrate an activity as it is happening.
  3. Practice writing a script based on real events.
  • Sweet Threads, Yo: This Creative Arts course is all about seeing needs and meeting needs via students’ creativity and capacity. Students will observe current trends in soccer uniform design and breakdown the needs of a soccer player. Students will gain an understanding of what appropriate attire can do to aid someone in their job. They will learn how to make clothes safe, effective, and aesthetically pleasing. The students will design their own version of a soccer uniform to be submitted for possible use by other students.

Intelligences: Spatial-Visual, Bodily-Kinesthetic

Main Manipulatives: iPad, vector images, camera

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn about a brief history of athletic uniform design from ancient times to current trends.
  2. Students will design appropriate attire for a soccer player taking into account physiological functions, kinesthetics, and safety concerns.
  3. Students will develop a sense of aesthetic that communicates movement, tradition, quality, skill, or innovation.

The Power of Storytelling

These last two weeks of classes have been wonderful. One particular class, Japanese Fables taught by Ms. Vagatai, has been a particular highlight. The students learned the dynamics of storytelling including the components that make up a story, and the distinction between a basic story and a fable. Ms. Vagatai exercised students auditory learning skills by reading them a Japanese fable, and then allowing them to critically think through selecting characters, a setting, and developing their own story to communicate a moral lesson.

The students really engaged! While they were given freedom to choose any story they wanted, they were required to make the story communicate a moral. While some of the student struggle to think linearly through narrative, this creative freedom allowed many of the students to participate and succeed in their writing in a way that was made much easier for them.

Ms. Vagatai also gave students the opportunity to present their fables aloud to their classmates on the last day of the course. The students were enthusiastic to share and when class ended they expressed their desire for more opportunities to create and present. Their enjoyment in the creative, writing, sharing, and listening process has sparked an interest in Language Arts that I am positive will continue on throughout the next quarter.

Origami with Mr. Streeter

 Students who practiced and perfected (mastered) their art of crane making were given the opportunity to serve their classmates as "Master Servants."

Students who practiced and perfected (mastered) their art of crane making were given the opportunity to serve their classmates as "Master Servants."

Mr. Streeter is teaching origami during this two-week segment of classes to Black, Orange, and Purple class. Here are his thoughts on origami in the classroom and how it is building creativity and critical thinking skills in the students to holistically build up their ability to problem-solve. 

"Origami (折り紙) — the ancient Japanese art of folding paper. The term “origami” comes from the Japanese words “ori” (to fold) and “kami” (paper). Traditionally, the art form utilizes a single sheet of paper (no cuts permitted) that is then manipulated and folded into infinite combinations of wonderful, complex, and masterful looking shapes.

The applications for origami in a classroom setting are just as infinite as the combinations of folds available. The students have been exploring history related to the ancient art, geometrical patterns and shapes, and using their creative capacities to shape a simple square sheet of paper into boxes, cranes, planes, and hexaflexagons!

The first lesson of one of these Creative Arts classes utilized the simplest folds – mountain folds and valley folds – to create triangles in a strip of paper. It seemed easy enough but when the strip was folded over on itself and taped at one connection point it created a looping three-sided hexagon called a trihexaflexagon. The concept behind this project was to encourage student to take whatever they have and play with it till they discover something new. The creator of the trihexaflexagon was just a student with some extra paper lying around during a class. Instead of discarding it as useless, he started fidgeting with it and created a phenomenal mathematical fidget toy.

In a recent article for Quark Magazine, a science and technology website dedicated to new research, Timothy Yeung highlights efforts to use origami to create tubes that can actually be combined into many unique geometries and angles, forming different three-dimensional structures for different purposes, making them adaptable to every situation and environment. This could lead to a great potential in quick assembly of emergency shelters and natural disaster relief. We believe our students will be the creators and difference makers God needs them to be and their exposure to origami will contribute to that purpose."

- Mr. Corey Streeter

I have seen the students in their origami classes work through feelings of frustration and practice patience and perseverance in the face of learning a new (and challenging) skill. As soon as the students accomplish a fold that previously seemed impossible for them, their desire to continue working grows. Not only that, but the ease with which they would consider giving up on a project also dwindles. The students continue to develop their fine motor skills as well as their linguistic intelligence during these projects. Teachers do not accept the explanation, "it's too hard," as a reason for why a student should give up or start over. Instead, the student is asked to explain what is hard and work through how they can resolve their issue. 

IMG_0098.JPG

The Next Two Weeks

Hello Parents,

In order to ensure that you know your child's classes while they are taking them, I wanted to send this list of our current courses, descriptions, and objectives that will be covered from now until March 2. 

This current two-week schedule is exciting as students are being introduced to origami during our Intercultural Studies theme and how it relates to math and literature, as well as art. Most of the students are already familiar with origami as an art form, so introducing them to the logic and process behind it will help them to "unlock the secrets" of origami. They will also continue on in their learning adventures with the Exploding Stuff theme, specifically regarding robotics and how they function. Please take a look at the new classes for these next two weeks below.

Monday / Thursday Theme: "Exploding Stuff"

  • Bible: This class is going to be a constant throughout this quarter. Here is the synopsis again for what the students are learning with Mr. Duffy:

This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more of the Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be able to understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

During this two-week session, students will continue to learn about foreigners and God's expectation on his people for the treatment of foreigners. As this course continues throughout the quarter, more course goals will be added below to reflect what the students are learning as the themes build. 

Goals of this course:

  1. Students learn that people (they) are responsible for their environment.
  2. Students learn how they can positively or negatively affect their environment.
  3. Students are able to articulate what God expects of his people in regards to their environment. 
  4. Students learn about refugees.
  5. Students learn what God thinks about refugees and immigrants.
  6. Students learn what God expects from his people regarding the treatment of refugees.
  • Programming: This is a STEM class where the students will continue working through some of the concepts from Robot Gutz. Specifically, they will continue to practice the scientific method, brainstorming with a group, and move into the discipline of computer science by programming the robots they built to perform tasks. This type of programming is fun for students, but beyond that it forces them to develop their logical thinking, to creatively problem-solve, and learn from their mistakes.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will continue practicing basic steps of the scientific method.
  2. Learn to program using a drag and drop interface.

Intelligences used: Logical/Mathematical, Spatial/Visual

  • Wait, What?: This Language Arts unit will focus on further developing a student’s communication skills through the medium of written board game instructions. Students will review verb forms and practice using imperative verbs to create their own set of clear, detailed, linear instructions for a board game.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn to note and define key vocabulary in the creation of their own board game instructions.
  2. Students will learn to identify imperative verbs and note their function in a set of board game instructions.
  3. Students will produce their own set of instructions for the board games they create in their “games creation” class.

Intelligences Used: Linguistic, Interpersonal/Social

  • Board? Create A Game!: In this class students will be taking the stories they wrote in language arts and using them to create character pieces and challenges for a board game they will work together to create in these two weeks. They will have to work together to craft clear instructions. In the final class of this unit, groups will trade games to evaluate the clarity and playability of each game.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will work together to implement a game vision into something playable in the real world.
  2. Students will use their iPad to create well-formatted instructions for their games.

Intelligences Used: Interpersonal/Social, Bodily-Kinesthetic, Logical-Mathematical, Spatial/Visual

Tuesday/Friday Theme: "Intercultural Studies"

  • 1,000 Paper Crane Project: This class offers another opportunity for students to develop fine motor skills, through the repetition of a particular art form-origami. The class is structured to emphasize Japanese values of precision and perfection which are achieved through repetition. Students will learn the story of Sadako and the 1,000 paper cranes, and work together across 3 homerooms to complete 1,000 origami cranes! They will compare their first crane with their last to see tangible evidence of the results of perseverance in practice.

Goals of this course:

  1. Student can follow detailed, pictorial instructions from start to finish.
  2. Student can observe and articulate the improvement between their first piece of origami and their last, over the course of 2 weeks.
  3. Student must work in collaboration with classmates to complete a team project.

Intelligences Used: Spatial/Visual, Linguistic, Bodily-Kinesthetic

  • Origametry: In this class, students will be learning the basics of Geometry. They will lock down their knowledge of squares, rectangles, and triangles, learn how to distinguish between the three shapes, and label them appropriately. This will complement the students’ origami classes and will enable them to create their own manipulatives with paper to understand different shapes and introduce them to fractions. The hands-on aspect of combining origami with geometry will allow students to practice the theory of fractions by translating a physical object (origami paper with folds) into a mathematical symbol (fractions of the paper created by folds). This will allow the students to concretize what they are learning in a way that is practical for them, rather than purely conceptual.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will learn the terms “numerator” and “denominator.”

  2. Students will understand how to determine the numerator and denominator of a fraction.

  3. Students will be able to verbally explain the differences between a rectangle, square, and triangle in order to relate the shapes back to numbers in fractions. 

Intelligences Used: Linguistic, Spatial/Visual, Bodily/Kinesthetic

  • Let's Origami: Students will learn the basics of origami as a creative art form. They will explore basic folds such as the mountain and valley folds. They will also explore the creation of various objects such as the crane, paper box, and hexaflexagon. Origami is a valuable tool to express the importance of patience, diligence, and creativity in all that the students do. As the students develop their abilities in folding paper, they begin to understand the focus and attention to detail that is required. Origami as an art form can connect students to the language arts in storytelling as well as mathematics through dividing up a single piece of paper into fractions through folds. Supplemental material will expose students to ways origami helps people reimagine problem-solving.  

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will be able to execute the mountain and valley folds.
  2. Students will be able to create a paper crane, paper box, and hexaflexagon.
  3. Students understand and can articulate the value of focus, patience, and creativity associated with folding paper.

Intelligences Used: Spatial/Visual, Logical-Mathematical

  • Japanese Fables: In this Language Arts course, students will be introduced to a few Japanese fables, discuss the characteristics of the animals found in those stories, and the moral lessons that are communicated in the stories. Then, students will write their own fables utilizing the elements that are observed in Japanese storytelling.

    Students will continue to acquire an appreciation for storytelling and recognize that stories can be found in all countries and cultures around the world. The will also continue to develop linguistic abilities as they read and discuss the stories presented in class. They will also be challenged to develop their spiritual faculties as they will be required to incorporate a biblical moral lesson in the fables they produce.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students will be able to identify the various characteristics of animals found in Japanese fables.
  2. Students will be able to identify the moral of a Japanese fable.
  3. Students will produce their own fable.

Intelligence Used: Linguistic

  • Japanese Fables: In this Language Arts course, students will be introduced to a few Japanese fables, discuss the characteristics of the animals found in those stories, and what the moral lessons that are communicated in the stories.  Then, students will write their own fables utilizing the elements that are observed in Japanese storytelling.

    Students will continue to acquire an appreciation for storytelling and recognize that stories can be found in all countries and cultures around the world. They will also continue to develop linguistic abilities as they read and discuss the stories presented in class. Finally, they will be challenged to develop their spiritual faculties as they will be required to incorporate a biblical moral lesson in the fables they produce.

Goals of this course:

  1. The students will be able to identify the various characteristics of animals found in Japanese Fables.
  2. Students will be able to identify the moral of a Japanese Fable.
  3. Students will produce their own fable.

Intelligences Used: Linguistic

Let's Go to the Library!

The class took its second outing to the library this past Wednesday in a continued effort to generate enthusiasm for recreational reading, as well as familiarize students with the process of researching various topics.

As soon as the kids walked through the doors they were at the computers trying to look up different books. They were looking for books about robotics, sushi, origami, and Japan; all topics that are currently being covered in their classes. They also found age-appropriate books that they could read for fun and were even open to suggestions from teachers about topics/titles that would potentially interest them. Their navigation of the library and their ability to use the Dewey Decimal system when looking up books has increased since their last visit. 

I checked out a few books for the classroom for the students to read during breaks or indoor recess that could go toward their 15 books for the reading challenge. I checked out titles for both boys and girls: The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis, Henry and Ribsy by Beverly Cleary, Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine, and Meet Felicity by Valerie Tripp. These were all books that I read in my childhood that I believe would grab the attention of the students and promote their enjoyment of reading. 

Please feel free to post a comment about books you've "caught" your student reading, or even suggestions on what I can check out and add to our in-class library. I would love to hear about how they are doing with reading at home.

 The only picture I managed to grab on our outing.  

The only picture I managed to grab on our outing.  

What's New in Computer Science and Intercultural Studies!

Hello Parents! We have concluded our second two-week block of the third quarter and it has been packed! No doubt you've heard reports of "Robot Gutz" and "Sushi Making" - these were favorites among the students. They also made some traditional Japanese gardens. Please read below to see exactly what your student has been up to these last two weeks and what they have been learning. It has been an action-packed two weeks!

 A group selfie on our first day building our class robot!

A group selfie on our first day building our class robot!

Monday / Thursday Theme: "Exploding Stuff"

  • Bible: This class is going to be a constant throughout this quarter. Here is the synopsis again for what the students are learning with Mr. Duffy:

This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more of the Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students learn that people (they) are responsible for their environment.
  2. Students learn how they can positively or negatively affect their environment.
  3. Students are able to articulate what God expects of his people in regards to their environment. 
  4. Students learn about refugees.
  5. Students learn what God thinks about refugees and immigrants.
  6. Students learn what God expects from his people regarding the treatment of refugees.

 

  • Robot Gutz: This class took a look at what robots are; how they are built and function. They learned about robotic components are such as motors, switches, actuators, and relays. By utilizing hands-on activities, students learned the steps of the Scientific Method in a way that engaged the linguistic (reading instructions), bodily-kinesthetic (acting out those instructions), and interpersonal (working with a team) intelligences. These activities also gave the students an example of how the Scientific Method can be applied to real-life situations in addition to the theoretical and conceptual.

    Goals for this course:

  1. Students learned and practice the basic steps of the scientific method.
  2. Students responded to why an experiment did or did not work.

 

  • Tell Me What To Do?!: Effective communication requires the ability to give clear, thorough instructions. Being able to receive and follow instructions carefully is an equally valuable skill. Because robots function entirely off of pre-determined instructions, we used this two-week unit on robotics as a chance to practice giving and following linear instructions. Games and activities required them to carefully follow instructions and culminated in students providing written instructions for their own "How-To" blog post.

Goals for this course:

  1. Students learned the components of good written instructions: defining terms, proper ordering of steps, and consideration of variables.
  2. Students followed written instructions that are new to them.
  3. Students created instructions for a five-step "How-To" blog post.

 

  • Build-A-Bot: In Build-A-Bot students had the opportunity to construct a basic robot out of everyday parts. This project required them to work together in a focused and intentional manner as they gained experience in working with robotics.

Goals for this course:

  1. Students gained experience in following a detailed tutorial by building a miniature strandbeest.
  2. Students improved their coordination and fine motor skills by working with small parts.
  3. Students improved their interpersonal awareness by working in pairs to accomplish a complicated task.

Tuesday / Friday Theme: "Japanese History"

  • Sushi Making: This Creative Arts course built upon the motor skills that we started developing in Japanese Script. Students were expected to be able to set up the materials and appropriately build a sushi roll. This required precise use of their fingers and wrists, as well as thinking through how they wanted their final roll to appear. In life, many projects require the senses of sight and touch. Sushi making adds smell and taste to the experience, allowing students to engage 80% of their senses while in one class. The students continued to deepen their cultural awareness and understanding by learning about the history of sushi making and how sushi came about as a food. Allowing students to try food from another culture helped to build up their global consciousness; but by having them participate in the creation of the food they had the opportunity to engage in an experience that could bond them with someone from another culture.

Goals of this course:

  1. Students continued their improvement upon finger dexterity and fine motor skills.
  2. Students learned about different flavor profiles and palettes, specifically that of "umami."
  3. Students developed in their ability to become globally conscious through the introduction of different cultural foods. 
 These girls were very proud of their first sushi roll! They called it "Samurai Sushi" and struck their pose.

These girls were very proud of their first sushi roll! They called it "Samurai Sushi" and struck their pose.

 

  • Japanese Architecture: Students explored the Japanese considerations of harmony by looking at the built environment. Students have learned in their Bible classes that ordering their environment is important; in this class they will see how that order can play out practically. By looking at the geometry behind the structure of the pagoda, student learned where the strength of the structure comes from. They also began to think about how to make appropriate building considerations for different terrains and natural phenomena. Students continued in their development of their fine motor skills as they made measurements on foam-board to create their own pagoda models. 

Goals for this course:

  1. Students worked in partners to construct their own Japanese pagoda building.
  2. Students measured accurately using inches and feet.
  3. Students worked with scaling as they consider their miniature models and scaled up to life size using multiplication.

 

  • Rock the Garden!: In the context of studying Japanese culture, students created rocking rock gardens, which developed their spatial intelligence and creative capacity for form and unity. A study of bonsai trees introduced the students to how the Japanese order their environments and then they correlated that to their own responsibility to care for and order the environment around them. Time was also spent considering the meditative aspect of zen gardens and how this translates into our times of prayer with the LORD.

Goals for this course:

  1. Students were introduced to long-term cultivation.
  2. Students connected the practice of maintaining a rock garden to maintaining unity in a form and ordering their environment.
  3. Students developed mental focus and meditation applied to a prayerful life and focus on God's ability to order an environment.

 

  • History of Japanese Gardens: In this Language Arts course students were introduced to the History of Japanese gardens and the various elements of these gardens (i.e. Zen garden). Then, students practiced researching and writing about their research in order to prepare a small presentation on their findings.

    Not only did this class continue to develop each student's global consciousness, but also developed their linguistic and natural abilities as they learn to sort through informational literature to find the main points or themes. They were also able to learn more about nature and the types of gardens or plants found in Japan. The main manipulatives of this class were pencil and paper.

Goals for this course:

  1. Students are able to know the history of Japanese gardens.
  2. Students are able to sort through informational literature to identify the main points.
  3. Students are able to name different types of Japanese gardens.

Specifics Spring 2018 Schedule - First Two Weeks

Black class.jpg

Hello parents! Welcome to the blog for my class. I will be updating it with information about the week, such as any fun activities we did that (hopefully) your student has told you about at home.

First and foremost, I wanted to post the schedule. I've had some questions about it since we've switched it up a bit this semester and I wanted to make sure you had access to it. For the entire third quarter all of your student's classes will have an overarching theme of either Computer Science or Japanese Culture. Each academic discipline (Language Arts, Creative Arts, and STEM) is taught throughout the day, but through the lens of Computer Science or Japanese Culture. Every two weeks within the quarter their course will take new slant within the overarching theme while still focusing on their academic discipline. These new slants are indicated in quotations. Please take a look at the courses from the first two weeks and their descriptions below.

Hopefully you have seen the explanation of how these classes were determined in Mr. Garner's video. If not, I highly recommend you give it watch. Click HERE to view.  If you haven't had a chance to, please watch that video before looking at the schedule, as the schedule will make more sense to you.

Monday / Thursday Theme: "Exploding Stuff"

  • Bible: This class is the second installment of Leviticus and will address more of the Levitical considerations such as sustainable communities, identification of culture, treatment of immigrants and foreigners, generation of fair and integrous business, increased responsibility of community leaders, festivals and calendars, rest, recreation and health, and debt forgiveness. These words are big now but soon the students will be understand what they mean and why they are important for us as we consider how to live out God’s word in our day-to-day.

The goals for this Bible class are:

  1. Students learn that people (they) are responsible for their environment
  2. Students learn how they can positively or negatively affect their environment
  3. Students are able to articulate what God expects of his people in regards to their environment 
  • Boomology: This was a STEM class focused on hands-on experiments where the students get to think through how chemicals relate to one another and the effect they can have. In this class the students were exposed to how chemicals, pressure, and temperature react. The students critically thought through the experiment they did, and about how and why certain elements reacted in order to gain understanding about why the reaction occurred. They were introduced to the terms, catalyst, reactant, and product.

The goals for this course are three-fold:

  1. To use basic cooking units of measurement, including converting measurements
  2. Follow step-by-step instructions in order to get the correct reaction from an experiment
  3. To critically think through an experiment and why it worked, not just what to do
  • History of Fireworks: In this Language Arts course students learned how to track the origins of a cultural phenomenon (fireworks) and note how and why a tradition develops. They practiced organized note-taking with new vocabulary words embedded into their notes. Students also practiced finding the key ideas communicated in research articles and informational videos. The course also touched on geography, reading dates (A.D. and B.C.), and ethical considerations for the use of explosives as compared to Scripture. The main manipulative is the iPad, both for reading articles and for taking notes. 

At the end of this course students should be able to:

  1. Answer 3 text-based questions when reading through an informational article
  2. Take and organize notes
  3. Write a short paragraph about what they have learned about the history of fireworks
  • The Boom Chronicles: This Creative Arts course is a tutorial creation class. The students have documented their experiments in Boomology and in this course had the chance to create tutorials in either Keynote and/or iMovie. This process solidified the lesson that they should pay attention to details of different steps within STEM related activities. It also forced them to be able to articulate the process that they had learned well enough that they could teach someone else.

At the end of this course the students will:

  1. Know the elements necessary to make a tutorial video
  2. Have made a tutorial video of their experiment from Boomology

Tuesday / Friday Theme: "Japanese History"

  • Japanese Script: In this Creative Arts course, students were introduced to the foreign scripts of Japan. They learned that not all countries use the same letters as we do, and that Japan is a country that has different symbols for their sounds. 

    Throughout their section on Japanese Culture, the students also learned about the discipline and precision with which the people of Japan apply to their lives, including writing. Students practiced writing their names and a fruit of the spirit in Japanese multiple times, trying to apply the same discipline and precision that the Japanese people do. Practicing script will allow the students to focus on a simple task and allow them to practice their finger dexterity and fine motor skills with a new method of writing.

The goals of this class are:

  1. Improve upon finger dexterity and fine motor skills
  2. See the benefit of practicing one skill in order to perfect it
  • Japanese Multiplication: This is a math class that uses multiplication in the form of drawing. Students are exposed to ways of doing multiplication that fall outside of strictly writing numbers, it gives them a visual and hands-on way to make sense of the concept of multiplication rather than memorizing facts.

By utilizing Japanese multiplication, students learned to connect the visual with conceptual and how to do that. By actualizing mathematical concepts into manipulative parts, students continue to develop their cognitive problem solving skills and build confidence in their ability to solve a problem presented to them. At the end of this course students are able to:

  1. Determine when multiplication is necessary
  2. Translate written numbers into a Japanese multiplication problem (conceptual into manipulative)
  • Rajio Taiso: This is Physical Education course that focused on an exercise that is popular in Japanese culture. It is practiced by both young and old and its purpose is to loosen up the body and prepare it for the day. It introduced the students to the Japanese values of unity, focus, and precise form within the discipline of group exercises. Students learned the health benefits, cultural practices, and history of Rajio Taiso. Within every class and activity, emphasis was placed on acting in a unified fashion, striving to perfect every motion through repetition and self-evaluation.

The goals for this class are:

  1. Learning about the Japanese cultural values of unity and discipline
  2. Focusing on one precise movement at a time, developing their fine motor skills and awareness fo their body movements 
  • Samurai Honor Code and Haiku: In this Language Arts course, students will be introduced to the History of Japan, specifically the Samurai and the Bushido code (Honor Code) that was developed and which still influences Japanese culture today. Students will also be introduced to the poetry form of Haiku. Then, students will practice writing Haikus about each of the 7 virtues highlighted in the Bushido code as well as evaluate this code based on what they know about the word of God and his expectations on us as his children.

    Not only will this class continue to develop each student's global consciousness, but will also develop their linguistic and intrapersonal faculties as they will be challenged to take the information they learn in class, meditate, reflect, and evaluate each virtue and try to capture their thoughts in the very concise form of Haiku poetry. The main manipulative of this class will be the iPad for note-taking and haiku writing.

The goals for this course are:

  1. To learn about the history of the Samurai and how they have affected Japanese culture even to the present day
  2. Know the 8 values of the Bushido Code
  3. How to write a Haiku poem

These first two weeks have been great and the students have been enjoying it. Make sure to keep up with Class DOJO for updates and posts about what the students have been doing. I am very excited about what the students get to experience and how they are learning this semester. The best way to learn is to be interested in your subject, and what better way to make it interesting for children than to let them choose the topic!